When you’re posting bail, you’re basically trading either property or money with a court to ensure (a) your release and (b) that you’ll uphold the law and appear for all your court hearings when out on bail.

In the event that you fail to present yourself in court, your bail becomes forfeit. You lose the bail that you already posted, you’re liable for arrest again, and you lose the collateral if there was one.

On the contrary, if everything goes right, you face no hurdles and have your money returned to you, regardless of being found guilty or innocent. What bail does, essentially, is to give you time out while waiting for the trial to make a decision.

What if the Court Is Denying Bail?

Yes, it’s completely possible that a court would deny bail. There are a number of reasons why this could happen, such as:

  • The judge feels that you will flee when out on bail and not return, and will thereby not take the risk of allowing a bail. This is usually the case when you show an apparent aggressiveness and put on a show.
  • You’ve already escaped from prison once and have been arrested again. The judge will not take the risk of allowing you a chance to escape again.
  • You have a number of penal code violations to your name.

Usually, after you are arrested, you are kept in jail until a bail amount can be worked out. The more severe the crime, the higher the amount. However, in the event that a judge might feel that you will be a threat to society or that you will make an attempt to flee, they may deny you bail.

How Does the Judge Decide that You Might Disappear?

Of course, the judge has no crystal balls to know for a fact what will happen in the future, but there are numerous red flags that can indicate your inclination to flee. These include:

  • A reliable source has told the judge that you do not plan on appearing in court
  • You have been irascible towards the court
  • You have missed court hearings on several occasions prior
  • Severe crime
  • You are not a citizen and there’s a possibility you could simply go back to your country
  • You have a mental impairment and are unsupervised

What to Do

Unless the judge denies you bail because the crime you committed is of a greatly nefarious nature (such as a terrorist plot or brutal serial murder, etc.), you can actually try getting the court to agree. Assure them that you will appear for all your court hearings—appeal to the attorneys and the judge alike. Make the judge believe you for being granted a chance to post bail.

As for the bail bonds, people in Gainesville, Florida, can reach out to Lee Calhoun Bail Bonds for a speedy release. You can get directions to our Gainesville office here or give us a call at (352) 379-9100.

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